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Continental Drift Quiz

As teachers, we are strongly encouraged to assess our students using "open ended response" questions. But, you know, the Hawaii State Achievement Tests are coming up the first week in March... yes, the end of the year tests are happening in March... and these tests consist almost entirely of multiple-choice questions, with only one or two "open ended" questions.

So, as we wrap up the first segment of our unit on continental drift, the students will be taking a multiple-choice test. To those of you who feel I might lack the appropriately progressive mind-set, well, too bad. I want my kids to do well on the HSAT, okay?

(Dunno how the formatting will translate -- I'm pasting a Word file)

QUIZ

Plate Tectonics & Continental Drift – Movement Within The Earth



STANDARD: Forces That Shape The Earth: SC 8.8.5 Explain the concepts of continental drift and plate tectonics: The student describes continental drift and how the Earth's crust is divided into plates that move on convection currents of magma in the mantle.
GLO #1, Responsibility for One’s Own Learning; GLO #4, Produce Quality Performance & Products.


INSTRUCTIONS: Complete the following questions accurately and neatly. Read each question carefully. Each question is worth 1 point. Total points possible: 50 points.

Multiple Choice – circle the correct response.


1. The Earth is what shape?
a. Flat and square, like a map.
b. Flat and round, like a dinner plate.
c. Flat and kind of diamond shaped, like home plate on a baseball field.
d. Spherical, like a ball.
e. Double helix, like a DNA molecule

2. Which events in the 1600s influenced theories on how continents were formed?
a. Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts.
b. Jamestown colony founded in Virginia.
c. Explorers began to map previously unexplored continents.
d. The Salem Witch Trials occurred.
e. The Black Death devastated much of Europe.

3. Alexander von Humboldt thought the Atlantic Ocean was:
a. really the Pacific Ocean.
b. connected to the Indian Ocean by underground channels.
c. a huge river.
d. imaginary.
e. too big to cross.

4. One of the first mapmakers to suggest that the continents had originally been a part of a single large land mass was:
a. the Italian Antonio Snider-Pellegrini in 1858.
b. the Italian Galileo in 1588.
c. the Italian Amerigo Vespucci in 1558.
d. the Italian Leonardo DaVinci in 1458.
e. the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Michelangelo in 1998.



5. Some scientists believe the earth “captured” the moon from outer space. This idea might help explain:
a. why the sky is blue.
b. why the bottom of the ocean is flat.
c. why the earth does not rotate.
d. how mountain ranges were formed. ( psst… this is the right answer!)
e. how the polar ice developed.

6. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is:
a. a professional hockey team from Nova Scotia.
b. the U.S. Director of Homeland Security.
c. a large tidal wave similar to a tsunami.
d. an underwater mountain range.
e. an underwater canyon.

7. The “theory of continental displacement” is the idea that:
a. continents formed when one large land mass broke apart into smaller sections.
b. continents were formed by large volcanoes.
c. continents were formed when the moon collided with the earth.
d. continents are formed when small islands combine to make big land masses.
e. continents float on top of the water.

8. A continental shelf is:
a. a shallow underwater section of land extending from the shoreline.
b. a valley at the very bottom of the ocean.
c. a type of soil characterized by a red color.
d. a shallow lake.
e. a deep ocean volcanic feature.

9. “Geometric Fit” suggests that:
a. geometry is a difficult mathematical concept.
b. the edges of continents fit together like pieces of a giant jigsaw puzzle.
c. continents rotate like sections of a Rubic’s Cube.
d. continents rise and sink like the mushrooms in Super Mario Brothers.
e. the Metric System is very difficult to understand.

10. Geologists used measurements of the crystals of this mineral found in South America and Africa to support the theory of continental drift:
a. Diamonds.
b. Quartz.
c. Coal.
d. Pumice.
e. Igneous rock.



11. Geologists also used evidence of these ancient land formations to support the idea of continental drift:
a. Rivers.
b. Lakes.
c. Mountain ranges.
d. Plateaus.
e. Arroyos.

12. About the year 1910 this scientist began developing the theory of continental displacement.
a. Porter Waggoner.
b. Alfred E. Newman.
c. Robert Wagner.
d. Alfred Wegener.
e. Albert Einstein.

13. “The congruency of the Atlantic coast” refers to:
a. underwater mountain ranges.
b. the continental shelf.
c. the apparent fit between the coastlines of South America and Africa.
d. a “lost continent” near Greenland.
e. the apparent fit between the coastlines of Greenland and Antarctica.

14. According to the textbook, “scientists found an excellent fit” between which of the following continents:
a. Greenland and Antarctica.
b. Australia and Antarctica.
c. Greenland and Australia.
d. Australia and North America.
e. Greenland and North America.

15. The specialized field of geology dealing with land structure is called:
a. Stratigraphy
b. Anthropology
c. Calisthenics
d. Technology
e. Tectonics

16. Scientists looking for evidence that the continents were once connected found all of the following examples except one. Which of the following is not evidence supporting the theory:
a. Mountain ranges in South America and Africa.
b. Boundaries between old and new rocks in South America and Africa.
c. Diamonds found in South America and Africa.
d. Matching coastline contours in South America and Africa.
e. Meteorite fragments found in South America and Africa.

17. According to the text, “layers of rock, like pages in a book, contain the history of the Earth over the last billion years.” The scientific process of “reading” these pages of history in the rocks is called:
a. Stratigraphy
b. Anthropology
c. Calisthenics
d. Technology
e. Tectonics

18. Sedimentary rock is created from:
a. Mud, silt, and sand.
b. Lava.
c. Magma.
d. Kimberlite.
e. Polycarbonate resin and silica.

19. Rock layers contain about this many years of the Earth’s history:
a. 50 to 100 years.
b. 350 to 500 years.
c. 10,000 to 100,000 years.
d. 1-million to 65-million years.
e. 400-million to 600-million years.

20. This type of stone is formed from the shells of marine organisms:
a. Sandstone.
b. Kimberlite.
c. Coal.
d. Limestone.
e. Granite.

21. This type of rock is formed from compressed masses of vegetation:
a. Sandstone.
b. Pyrite.
c. Coal.
d. Limestone.
e. Granite.

22. Huge frozen rivers of ice moving slowly down mountain valleys are called:
a. Glaciers.
b. Earthquakes.
c. Avalanches.
d. Landslides.
e. Icebergs.



23. Glacial deposits are piles of rocks, sand, and boulders left behind by:
a. colliding icebergs.
b. fault line shifting.
c. melting glaciers.
d. the moon being ejected from the Pacific Ocean.
e. volcanic eruptions.

24. In a regular stratigraphy sample, the oldest rocks are usually found:
a. near the top.
b. near the center.
c. at the bottom.
d. by themselves.
e. old rocks are not usually found.

25. In a regular stratigraphy sample, the newest rocks are usually found:
a. near the top.
b. near the center.
c. at the bottom.
d. by themselves.
e. new rocks are not usually found.

26. In a stratigraphy sample, a layer of coal found beneath a layer of limestone would indicate:
a. volcanic eruptions covered an area with ash.
b. an ancient forest area became submerged beneath the sea.
c. an ancient sea floor dried out and became a forest.
d. an ancient desert became submerged beneath the sea.
e. an ancient sea floor dried out and became a desert.

27. In a stratigraphy sample, a layer of limestone found beneath a layer of coal would indicate:
a. volcanic eruptions covered an area with ash.
b. an ancient forest area became submerged beneath the sea.
c. an ancient sea floor dried out and became a forest.
d. an ancient desert became submerged beneath the sea.
e. an ancient sea floor dried out and became a desert.

28. A diagram of rock layers is called:
a. a stratigraphic column.
b. a strategic defense initiative.
c. a spirographic design.
d. an interstellar vortex.
e. a line graph.


29. Fossils are:
a. the remains of plants and animals that lived a long time ago preserved in stones and rocks.
b. a type of colorful gemstone.
c. the part of a sink that the water comes out of.
d. a New Zealand rugby team.
e. a theory devised by Alexander Von Humboldt.

30. Fossils help scientists discover:
a. gold mines.
b. diamond mines.
c. what kinds of animals and plants lived long ago, and where they lived.
d. what kinds of rocks emerged from ancient volcanoes.
e. new planets.

31. Which of the following animals is a marsupial?
a. crocodile.
b. horse.
c. jaguar.
d. kangaroo.
e. lobster.

32. The greatest variety of living marsupials today are found on which continent?
a. North America.
b. South America.
c. Africa.
d. Australia.
e. Europe.

33. Why is information about marsupials of interest to scientists studying continental drift?
a. They need to know how far a kangaroo can hop.
b. They wonder why there are wallabies living in Hawaii.
c. They think wombats might be carnivorous.
d. They use the information to understand how animals
migrate.
e. They don’t really care about marsupials.

34. A “land bridge” is:
a. a narrow strip of land that connects two large areas or continents.
b. a continent that moves.
c. an underwater mountain range.
d. a type of jeep that explorers and hunters drive.
e. an area where kimberlite deposits are found.


35. Land bridges allow what to happen:
a. birds to migrate.
b. sea creatures to find food.
c. land animals to migrate.
d. wind currents to circulate.
e. fish to migrate.

36. Why were Alfred Wegener and other scientists interested in fossils?
a. They liked to collect specimens to sell to museums.
b. They thought dinosaurs were cool.
c. The information about animal populations provided evidence of continental displacement.
d. The Permian strata suggested a structural anomaly on glacial rift zones.
e. They thought fossils were a potential food source during expeditions.

37. Name the “land bridge” that connects the present-day continents of North America and South America:
a. The Golden Gate Bridge.
b. The Bridge on the River Kwai.
c. The Cape of Good Hope.
d. The Isthmus of Panama.
e. The Suez Canal.

38. Based on what we have learned about “stratigraphy” and fossils, where would you expect to find the fossil bones of a dinosaur compared to the bones of a tiger?
a. Tiger bones buried deeper than dinosaur bones.
b. Dinosaur bones buried deeper than tiger bones.
c. Tiger bones and dinosaur bones buried in the same strata.
d. Tigers do not have bones.
e. It is impossible to tell dinosaur bones and tiger bones apart.

39. The word “ancient” (pronounced: ain-shunt) means:
a. very old.
b. very cold.
c. very boring.
d. very stone-like.
e. very beautiful.

40. Geology is the study of:
a. rocks and minerals.
b. ancient life.
c. outer space.
d. the sea.
e. forests.


41. Paleontology is the study of:
a. ancient human cultures.
b. ancient volcanic eruptions.
c. ancient ocean basins.
d. ancient history.
e. ancient life forms.

42. The abbreviation “MYA,” when used in geology, means:
a. Mid-Atlantic Youth Association.
b. Moto-cross Youth Adventures.
c. Multitudes of Years of Ancientness.
d. Mondo Yummy Apricots.
e. Millions of Years Ago.

43. What ever happened to Alfred Wegener, the scientist who first seriously proposed the theory of continental drift?
a. He retired at the age of 80 and died peacefully at the age of 92 in London.
b. He starred in a TV science show for kids in the 1950s.
c. He disappeared while exploring Greenland in 1930.
d. He was a passenger on the ill-fated passenger ship, RMS Titanic.
e. He discovered King Tut’s tomb in Egypt in 1922.

44. In the debate over the continental drift theory, “drifters” are:
a. people who believe one large continent broke apart and the sections moved.
b. people who believe the continents and ocean basins are relatively stable.
c. people who believe continents are pieces of the moon that fell to Earth.
d. people who believe that volcanoes are responsible for all land forms.
e. idiots.

45. In the debate over the continental drift theory, “fixists” are:
a. people who believe one large continent broke apart and the sections moved.
b. people who believe the continents and ocean basins are relatively stable.
c. people who believe continents are pieces of the moon that fell to Earth.
d. people who believe that volcanoes are responsible for all land forms.
e. morons.

46. In the movie we watched in class, The Mole People, the scientist at the beginning of the film discussed which of the following theories:
a. continental displacement.
b. plate tectonics.
c. the hollow Earth.
d. shifting of the axis.
e. electromagnetism and gravity.



47. In the movie we watched in class, The Mole People, the main characters were which type of scientist:
a. Paleontologists – studying ancient life forms.
b. Archaeologists – studying ancient cultures and civilizations.
c. Zoologists – studying animal life.
d. Geologists – studying rocks, minerals, and land forms.
e. Entomologists – studying insects.

48. In the movie we watched in class, The Mole People, the scientists discovered the broken arm of an old statue in a pile of rocks and rubble after an avalanche of ice and snow. This pile of rocks and rubble is most similar to:
a. a sedimentary deposit.
b. a glacial deposit.
c. a fossil.
d. a stratigraphic column
e. an ionic column

49. In the movie we watched in class, The Mole People, the scientists discovered a stone tablet buried in the ground. They discussed the strata the tablet was buried in. Why was the strata important to the scientists?
a. It could tell them what the tablet was made of.
b. It could help them read the writing on the tablet.
c. It could tell them how old the tablet was.
d. It could tell them who made the tablet.
e. The strata was not important.

50. The terms “continental drift,” “continental displacement,” “tectonics,” “plate tectonics,” and “continental plate movement” all mean pretty much the same thing:
a. True.
b. False.

Extra Credit Question (5 points): What is the name of the “super continent” or giant land mass that some scientists say existed over 250-million years ago, and which later broke up into the pieces that became the continents we have today?
a. Atlantis.
b. Patagonia.
c. Shangri-La.
d. Pangaea.
e. Paramanantham.

Correct answers: __________ Extra Credit: _________ Total Points: _________

Corrected by: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬____________________________
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